Press Release

AUSTIN (September 12, 2003) – The Old West Austin Historic District in Austin was listed recently in the National Register of Historic Places. The Texas Historical Commission assisted in the nomination of this important neighborhood for inclusion in the National Register in recognition of its importance to the history of Austin. The district features 1574 contributing properties. Recognized for their architectural and historical significance, they join other sites in Travis County and around the state with National Register status.

The Old West Austin Historic District encompasses three suburbs platted in more than forty subdivisions that wind between Shoal Creek and the Mo-Pac Expressway from 13th to 35th Streets, northwest of downtown Austin, Texas. As a well-preserved collection of early- to mid-twentieth-century residences, the historic district evokes the measured spread of suburban development that paralleled the city’s steady growth. Houses in the district, many of which were designed by prominent architects, reflect architectural styles popular from the mid-19th through mid-20th centuries.

The National Register of Historic Places is the Nation’s official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation. Authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Register is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect our historic and archeological resources. The National Register includes over 2,000 listings in Texas. Listing affords properties a measure of protection from the possible impact of federally funded projects, as well as access to technical expertise and grant funds to facilitate their restoration and preservation. Income-producing properties are also eligible for federal tax benefits for sympathetic rehabilitation work.

The Old West Austin Historic District encompasses three suburbs platted in more than forty subdivisions that wind between Shoal Creek and the Mo-Pac Expressway from 13th to 35th Streets, northwest of downtown Austin, Texas. As a well-preserved collection of early- to mid-twentieth-century residences, the historic district evokes the measured spread of suburban development that paralleled the city’s steady growth. Houses in the district, many of which were designed by prominent architects, reflect architectural styles popular from the mid-19th through mid-20th centuries.

The National Register of Historic Places is the Nation’s official list of cultural resources worthy of preservation. Authorized under the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Register is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect our historic and archeological resources. The National Register includes over 2,000 listings in Texas. Listing affords properties a measure of protection from the possible impact of federally funded projects, as well as access to technical expertise and grant funds to facilitate their restoration and preservation. Income-producing properties are also eligible for federal tax benefits for sympathetic rehabilitation work.

“Listing in the National Register follows a tremendous amount of preparation,” said Larry Oaks, Executive Director of the Texas Historical Commission. “Many individuals contribute to the nomination of these properties, including the owners, local preservation organizations, our staff, and our professional review board. The citizens of Austin can be very proud of this accomplishment.”

The Texas Historical Commission is the state agency for historic preservation. Its staff administers a wide range of programs that seek to preserve the heritage of the state and the historic investments of its citizens. For more information, write P.O. Box 12276, Austin, Texas 78711, or call 512-463-6100.